Thursday, September 24, 2015

And then the sheep told me... spinning for tapestry (Okay, maybe it was Maggie)

I am becoming a spinner. I resisted spinning for years even though I bought a spinning wheel in 2010 to ply my tapestry singles on. I resisted because I was afraid I would get hooked and there is only so much time in a day. Tapestry is slow going and when would I have time to spin? Also, I didn't see the relationship between spinning and tapestry weaving.

Now I have to give myself a little dope slap when I remember that. I have learned so much about yarn characteristics in the last 6 months. And all of this is directly relevant to my art work which is made with, what?

Yarn.

Which comes from where?

Sheep.

Which is made into yarn how?

Spinning.

So imagine my joy upon seeing an email from Kate Larson in my inbox asking if I'd be okay with a blog post about my recent handspun tapestry project on the Interweave Spinning Daily blog.

Here it is! (Well, you have to click the link below to see it...)

http://www.spinningdaily.com/blog/handspun-for-tapestry-weaving





5 comments:

  1. YAHOO! You deserve it, Rebecca. I'm so proud to be one of your students. I hope, someday, I'll make you proud too.

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  3. Ha! It is a Duh! moment when suddenly it clicks. Welcome to the weird world of spinning. As if knitting, weaving, or anything else isn't weird enough. I am practicing my weaving yarn techniques, getting ready for the new class in a couple of weeks.

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  4. 9.26.2015 Hi, Rebecca.....Thanks for showing us your beautiful purple shaded yarns and for being such a beautiful teacher person to take time to help me with my weft problems on my portrait tapestry run. Your accessibility is appreciated more than you can imagine. Sarah Swett ranks high with me in that category too. And another big thank you for intro-ing Kate Larson's blog. Never had read it before. Love that green/yellow/gray yarn with all the cables she is working with. That color opens up a spinner/dyer's heart into possibilities. Her perceptions of work baskets with unfinished work residing therein is a welcome concept embracing all our creative "fullings." from Janet in NJ

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    1. You're welcome Janet! Kate is definitely inspirational. I heard her talk a little bit at a Michigan conference I taught at this summer and she has stories for everything... she does a lot of spinning and knitting based in Scandinavian patterns. Just love the way her brain works. Cheers!

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